Periodontal Surgery -- Soft Tissue Graft

Periodontal disease often refers to bacterial plaque and infections around the gum and tooth root. It can happen around one or several teeth. In some cases, the gum tissue is damaged or shrinks. In its more advanced stages, surgery to create new gum tissue (and even bone growth) can be done. There are several techniques used to encourage new gum growth using donor tissue, man-made material, or tissue from the roof of the patient’s mouth. Periodontal DiseaseCopyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • Call Your Periodontist

    Call your periodontist if any of these occur:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, a lot of bleeding, or any unusual discharge from the surgical site(s)
    • Pain and swelling that is not controlled with the medications given
    • The dressing or stitches become loose or are uncomfortable
    • Loose tissue
    • Continued swelling after 48 hours
    • Other new symptoms, allergic reactions, or concerns
    • Persistent nausea and/or vomiting

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    Periodontal disease often refers to bacterial plaque and infections around the gum and tooth root. It can happen around one or several teeth. In some cases, the gum tissue is damaged or shrinks. In its more advanced stages, surgery to create new gum tissue (and even bone growth) can be done. There are several techniques used to encourage new gum growth using donor tissue, man-made material, or tissue from the roof of the patient’s mouth.

    Periodontal Disease

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    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    This surgery is needed to:


    • Cover tooth roots that are exposed, which can lead to bone loss and
      decay
    • Reduce tooth sensitivity
    • Even out gum tissue due to reduce further recession

    Not all grafts are successful over time. The level of disease and your personal care routines will affect success.

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your periodontist will review potential problems, like:

    • Tooth sensitivity
    • Changes in gum appearance; uneven gum line
    • Graft failure
    • Bleeding
    • Reaction to the sedation medications
    • Infection
    • Swelling
    • Nausea and vomiting

    Before your procedure, talk to your periodontist about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic diseases, such as diabetes or obesity