Oophorectomy

Oophorectomy is the removal of one or both ovaries. This may be combined with removing the fallopian tubes (salpingo-oophorectomy). Removal of the ovaries and/or fallopian tubes is often done as part of a complete or total hysterectomy .

  • Call Your Doctor

    After you leave the hospital, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Persistent or increased vaginal bleeding or discharge
    • Pain that you cannot control with the medications you have been given
    • Nausea and/or vomiting that you cannot control with the medications you were given after surgery, or which last for more than two days after discharge from the hospital
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge from the incision sites
    • Difficulty urinating
    • Swelling, redness, or pain in your leg
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain
    • Feeling depressed

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition


    Oophorectomy is the removal of one or both ovaries.
    This may be combined with removing the fallopian tubes (salpingo-oophorectomy). Removal of the ovaries and/or fallopian tubes is often done as part of a complete or total
    hysterectomy
    .

    The Female Reproductive System
    Nucleus factsheet image
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    An oophorectomy may be done to:

    • Treat cancer

    • Remove a large
      ovarian cyst
    • Treat chronic pelvic pain

    • Treat
      pelvic inflammatory disease
      (PID)

  • Possible Complications

    Complications are rare, but no procedure is completely free of risk. If you are planning to have an oophorectomy, your doctor will review a list of possible complications. These include:

    • Changes in sex drive

    • Hot flashes and other symptoms of
      menopause
      if both ovaries are removed
    • Depression
      and other forms of psychological distress
    • Reaction to anesthesia
    • Bleeding

    • Blood clots, particularly in the
      veins of the legs
    • Damage to other organs
    • Infection

    Factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

    • Previous pelvic surgery or serious infection
    • Obesity
    • Smoking
    • Diabetes

    Be sure to discuss the risks with your doctor before the surgery.