Nephrectomy

In a radical nephrectomy, the whole kidney is removed. In a partial nephrectomy, only the diseased piece of the kidney is removed.

  • Call Your Doctor


    Call your doctor if any of the following occur:

    • Signs of infection, including fever or chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge from the incision site
    • Persistent nausea and/or vomiting
    • Pain that you cannot control with the medications you have been given
    • Difficulty urinating
    • Sudden weakness

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    In a radical nephrectomy, the whole kidney is removed. In a partial nephrectomy, only the diseased piece of the kidney is removed.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    Kidney removal may need to be done because of:

    • Birth defects
    • Injuries to the kidney
    • Infection
    • Tumor
    • Kidney donation for a transplant

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Infection
    • Bleeding
    • Blood clots
    • Damage to nearby organs
    • Reactions to the anesthesia
    • Leakage of urine from the remaining kidney tissue, if only part of the kidney is removed

    Long-term complications from decreased kidney function may include:

    • High blood pressure
    • Chronic kidney disease

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic diseases, such as diabetes or obesity